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Excavation

  • Giarnera Piccola
  • Ascoli Satriano
  •  
  • Italy
  • Apulia
  • Provincia di Foggia
  • Ascoli Satriano

Summary (English)

  • The 2011 excavations on the Giarnera Piccola, undertaken by the University of Innsbruck’s Institute of Classical Archaeology, re-opened the same areas as in previous years. The area was extended by a total of 135 m2, in particular towards the west, concentrating on the area of the necropolis.

    In the case of structure 11, the material from a pit (1.20 m deep) below the remains of the paved floor inside the house provided a terminus post quem of the 4th century B.C. The west and north walls, built to enlarge the structure from 15.5 to 17.5 m2 also dated to this phase. Tomb 5/11 was discovered almost below the east wall of house 11. It had eight covering slabs, one with an oblong aperture in which to insert another stone. The tomb group comprised four sub-geometric Daunian II vases datable to between the 6th and 5th century B.C. The area west of house 11 was delimited by a partially preserved wall, running parallel to wall 617.

    The remains of a new structure emerged in the space between structures 11 and 10 and directly beside tomb 3/10. Denominated house 9, it comprised two rooms covering circa 25 m2.
    Due to lack of time, it was not possible to follow the line of the supporting wall identified in 2010. The zones adjacent to the wall were investigated.

    To the east of wall 617, below two tile collapses, a gravel floor surface came to light in which there was a channel constructed with large stones. Fragments of fine and coarse ware pottery, including large column kraters decorated in the floral style of the 4th century B.C., were recovered from a triangular-shaped deposit positioned on the west side of wall 617. This deposit may have been created during abandonment rituals.

    The structural evidence overlying wall 617, including house 9 excavated in 2011, constitutes a residential area on the terracing.

    Zone J, west of the excavation area, was seen to be of greater interest in chronological terms for the quantity and variety of burials, and the presence of numerous postholes. Of the ten identified tombs, four had been robbed, while six were intact or only disturbed by agricultural activity and dated to between the 7th and 4th century B.C. (tombs 2/11, 3/11, 4/11, 6/11, 9/11, 11/11). Together with the finds from 2010, the latest finds show the necropolis to have been fairly densely occupied. It was in use throughout the Daunian presence on the site. Two enchytrismos burials in medium sized impasto pottery vessels were also found.

    As well as the usual data regarding the age and sex of the skeletal remains, the anthropological analyses undertaken in Munich showed that the male individual in the double tomb 4/11 had suffered severe lesions to the cranium caused by a heavy weapon. These were not, however, the cause of death.

  • Astrid Larcher - Università di Innsbruck, Istituto di Archeologia Classica e Provinciale Romana 

Director

  • Astrid Larcher - Università di Innsbruck, Istituto di Archeologia Classica e Provinciale Romana

Team

  • K. van Heykin - Università di Monaco di Baviera
  • L. Obojes
  • M. Auer
  • T. Senfter
  • S. Reyer-Völlenklee - Università di Innsbruck
  • Manuele Laimer - Università di Innsbruck, Istituto di Archeologia Classica e Provinciale Romana

Research Body

  • Università di Innsbruck, Istituto di Archeologia Classica e Provinciale Romana

Funding Body

  • Università di Innsbruck

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