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Excavation

  • Via Gemina
  • Aquileia
  •  
  • Italy
  • Friuli Venezia Giulia
  • Provincia di Udine
  • Aquileia

Summary (English)

  • The area of the so-called “Triclinium of the Flowered Carpet”, uncovered in the 1960s by Luisa Bertacchi in the garden next to the Carabinieri barracks, would seem to constitute the reception area of the house that is the subject of this archaeological investigation.

    In 2006 the discovery of the last part of the mosaic, facing onto the peristyle, linked this sector of the house to the excavation of the floor known as the “Flowered Carpet” and suggested the existence of a large residence, probably owned by Imperial functionaries or high ranking locals. The most recent work brought to light several rooms of substantial dimensions used for bathing purposes. These were characterised by pavements of crushed limestone with coloured insertions, supported by imposing substructures, suggesting that this was a public bath complex datable to between the late Republican and early Imperial period, which would thus be suitably positioned in the busiest, both politically and commercially, part of the town.

    Amongst the ceramic finds there was a prevalence of amphorae, especially those of African origin. The commonest types were Keay XXV, XXVI, XXXV and LXII which give a chronology between the 4th-6th century A.D. Numerous fragments of handles, body sherds and amphora points were found which could not be linked to specific forms. Of the Eastern productions the table amphora LRA 3 was present together with types LRA 1 and LRA 4, recognisable mainly from body sherds and handles as few rims were found. Of the Italic productions the Lamboglia 2 amphora was present in its earliest form with short triangular rim. Of amphorae with a funnel-shaped rim the Keay LII was present as were a few examples of Dressel 6A and 6B. African sigillata C and D, dating to between the 4th-5th century A.D. was also found together with table wares. Amongst the pottery for domestic use coarse wares were predominant in the form of cooking pots, pans, one handle jugs and basin fragments. (MiBAC)

  • MiBAC 

Director

  • Federica Fontana - Università degli Studi di Trieste, Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia

Team

  • Franca Maselli Scotti - Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici del Friuli Venezia Giulia
  • Federica Fontana - Università degli Studi di Trieste, Scuola di Specializzazione in Archeologia

Research Body

  • Università degli Studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità”Leonardo Ferrero”

Funding Body

  • Università degli Studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità”Leonardo Ferrero”

Images

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