logo

FOLD&R Italy Series

Editors: Elizabeth Fentress, Luigi Malnati
Executive Editor: Helga Di Giuseppe
Scientific Committee: Mariarosaria Barbera, Henner von Hesberg, Antonio De Siena, Anna Maria Dolciotti, Lucilla de Lachenal, Jeannette, Papadopoulos, Raffaella Poggiani, Christopher Smith, Catherine Virlouvet
Committee of Superintendences: Giovanni Azzena, Angelo Bottini, Egle Micheletto, Massimo Osanna, Fulvia Lo Schiavo, Marina Sapelli Ragni

  • To download the FOLD&R document, please click on the link [PDF] which is located under the title of the document.
  • In order to make a hyperlink to a FOLD&R document, please make reference to the [permalink] option. This is a permanent link to the document on our server.

Index for 2012

  • 272 - Chiara Blasetti Fantauzzi, Salvatore De Vincenzo. 2012. Nuove indagini alla cinta muraria di Erice (TP). Le campagne di scavo 2010 e 2011 . The analysis of the vertical stratigraphy of the city walls of Eryx revealed the existence of three construction techniques prior to the Middle Ages one. As a result of the excavation of the foundation levels of 5 towers, made during the summer of 2010 and 2011, we have been able to date, although in a preliminary stage, the first and third phase of the walls. Based on the Attic pottery found, the first phase can be dated in the early fifth century B.C. The second phase is conserved only in hight, while the third made by pseudo isodoma masonry, seems to date from the late republican age, probably in the second half of the first century B.C. This highlights a significant rearrangement of the Roman period. These preliminary investigations also showed that the city in pre-Roman and Roman times was smaller, reaching its current size probably only in the Middle Ages. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 271 - Alessandro Sebastiani, Elena Chirico, Matteo Colombini, Mario Cygielman. 2012. Spolverino (Alberese – GR): relazione alla II campagna di scavi archeologici . The aim of this paper is to show the preliminary results of the second archaeological season at the Roman river port of Rusellae, in the territory of Alberese (Grosseto, IT). The research has led to the discovery of a large glass workshop, dated from the late 2nd c. up to the end of the 5th c.. Two kilns for blowing vessels have been identified, with a counter built in stones and tiles. Outside of this workshop a bigger kiln has been revealed, used to temper the glass objects. The excavations have also proved the presence of a metalworking infrastructure, inside the large opus incertum building found in 2010. The base of a forge, as well as a big cocciopesto basin, has come back to the light, with a large collection of bronze and iron objects. The site seems to be in decline soon after the late 5th c. AD: a necropolis was set on the ruins of the buildings, made up of at least 4 burials. From the mid 6th c. AD, the area was used as an agricultural field , as 12 furrows can witness. Century by century, then, the site was subject to periodical floodings, resulting in a 2m thick level of clay sealing the archaeological remains. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 270 - Valentina Caminneci, Maria Serena Rizzo, Maria Antonietta Russo. 2012. “Ci sono più cose in cielo e in terra...” Due metodologie diverse per investigare il passato: il Castello Nuovo di Sciacca tra storia e archeologia . The history of Sciacca and Castello Nuovo documented by archival sources and further enriched by the researches conducted by Soprintendenza of Agrigento is in the dump of the castle, which has yielded important evidence for its material culture. The paper proceeds through the synoptic reading of the archaeological and archive data, offers a pattern of daily life at the castle from the 14th to the 16th century, when Sciacca with its port plays a leading role in Mediterranean trade. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 269 - Carlo Rescigno . 2012. Cuma, acropoli. Scavi al Tempio Superiore: II campagna (estate 2012). A team from the Second University of Naples has been excavating the upper temple of the acropolis of Cuma since 2010. The two campaigns have made it possible to redefine the chronology of the phases covered by the monument, bringing to light new structural phases and dating those already visible. The re-examination of old and new finds have also allowed us to open a new discussion of the dedication of the temples and the ritual function of the so-called temple of Jove in the context of a renewed topographic approach to the antiquities of the acropolis. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 268 - Simonetta Menchelli, Oriana Cerbone. 2012. Ceramiche fini nell'ager Firmanus (Fermo, Marche meridionali). The paper deals with the Fine Wares found in the ager Firmanus within the Pisa South Picenum Survey Project. The assemblage is formed by 394 items belonging to various classes (thin-walled pottery, Italian sigillata, mid-Adriatic sigillata; coated coarse ware; African Red slip; Phocean Red slip), dated from the 2nd cent BC to the 7th cent. AD. The items have been found in 155 different Topographic units, mostly in the major sites interpreted as villas. Besides dating the context, these fine wares provide a high informative potential concerning many aspects of the ancient economy and social life. E.g. the Latial-Campanian thin-walled pottery dated 2nd cent. B.C. could be interpreted as evidence of the Romanization process in the Ferman countryside; the imported African and Phocean Red slip document the commercial activities run along the Adriatic coasts up to Late Antiquity. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 267 - Marco Valenti. 2012. Miranduolo (Chiusdino – SI) Campagna 2012. The twelfth campaign of excavation concentrated on areas already begun in previous years (Areas 1, 11, 14, 15, and 17), adding on a new one inside the northern sector of the circuit wall (Area 18). For the phases of the stone castle (second half of eleventh-twelfth century), on the southwest slope a new segment of the circuit wall was found, while at the base of the hill a metallurgical atelier was investigated. On the north side, a significant building abutted the walls. As yet only partially investigated, it could be interpreted as the seat of the garrison. Outside the walls in the same area are also found traces of the village/home farm of the ninth and tenth centuries. More complete evidence comes from the village of the eighth century, where silos, and open space for agricultural activities and the southern portion of the palisade that closed off the site were found. Within the cemetery the earliest burials were found very probably relating to the last phase of the wooden church (ninth-tenth century) and its stone-built successor (late tenth century). PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 266 - Marco Valenti. 2012. Santa Cristina (Buonconvento – SI): le campagne di scavo dal 2009 al 2012. The first of four projected campaigns at the site of Santa Cristina in Caio allowed us to investigate the use of a bath complex built between the last third of the first century BC and the first half of the first century AD, as well as the reuse of the complex for production immediately after its abandonment, and successive phases of occupation. The baths were inserted inside a vast rural complex that can be interpreted as a village with the additional function of a mansio along the via Cassia, probably part of the cursus publicus indicated in the Tabula Peutingeriana as a detour of the Cassia between Chiusi and Siena. After the abandonment of the baths in the middle of the fourth century it was transformed for artisanal activities, lead working and probably glass production. Between the end of the sixth and the eighth century – the last phase of the complex – the complex remained a village, with huts of different typologies. On the summit of Poggio alle Fonti, a hill adjacent to the excavation, we know that there was in the first quarter of the ninth century an oratory called Sancta Christina, which we later find documented as a parish. Abandoned after the middle of the sixteenth century and demolished at the end of the eighteenth, nothing remains of the church. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 265 - Giuseppe Lepore, Giuliano de Marinis, Francesco Belfiori , Federica Boschi , Michele Silani . 2012. Progetto “archeologia urbana a Senigallia” II: le ricerche di via Baroccio e di via Gherardi . In the context of the Senigallia Urban Archaeological Project, started in 2010, two important operations of preventive archaeology were carried out at the end of 2011. In both cases the archaeological excavation was preceded by a georadar survey of the area under investigation. The first intervention pertains to an area located in via Baroccio, which revealed a situation of extraordinary importance. In fact, the exploration discovered a sacred complex probably founded by the first Roman colonists at the beginning of the III century B.C., and the remains of the Roman city walls. Initially, the sanctuary was open air and extra moenia with rituals organized around votive stones. In a second phase two sacella were created, at the same time of the construction of the city wall, which made the sanctuary urban. The second excavation took place in via Gherardi and revealed some republican Roman structures, which indicated the extension of the roman colony of Sena Gallica. But the most important finding is a building founded directly over the Roman structures, dated to around the XIIIth century A.D. This case show the continuous using of the Roman levels also in the early Middle Age, up to the great constructive activities of Sigismondo Malatesta (1448-1456). PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 264 - Sabrina Cisci. 2012. Cagliari - indagini archeologiche presso il bastione di Santa Caterina. The excavation brought to light a pluri-stratified site. In the first phase, apparently of the Phoenician-Punic period, the area was occupied by an ashlar wall plastered with opus signinum, belonging to a building possibly connected with the underground room beneath it. This had a bottle-shaped section, and a plan which ended in an apse to the east. There were niches in the wall and a pavement in opus signinum. In a second phase, the underground room was abandoned, and at its northeast end a cut, filled with earth, was found. In spite of he absense of finds, its form is that of a tomb, an hypothesis supported by the find of two fragments of a sarcophagus lid, on one of which was found a funerary inscription datable between the end of the second and the beginnning of the third century AD. A period of abandonment followed the use of the area for burials the underground room filled with a series of deposits, later cut for a use difficult to determine. In its last phase the room was fulled with a single deposit dating to the end of the nineteenth century, when the area was affected by the construction of the bastion of Saint Remy. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 263 - Anna Luisa Sanna. 2012. Iglesias, chiesa di Santa Chiara (CI): scavi nella cattedrale di Ugolino della Gherardesca (2010-2011) . Following the removal of the nineteenth-century altar it was possible, between November 2010 and January 2011 to investigate the area of the presbytery and its junction with the nave. The removal of the heavy pavement revealed a building sequence that began with a series of wooden coffins, continued through the sixteenth and seventeeth-century modifications (the enlargement of the presbytery and the modification of the profile of the balustrade, as well as a series of pavements) and to reach the square presbytery that cancelled the original form in the sixteenth century. The sixteenth century construction can be attributed to the brief period when Iglesias became the seat of the dioces and Santa Chiara assumed the title of Cathedral. It completely changed the conception of the sacred space, razing and enlarging the original church constructed by Ugolino della Gherardesca. The whole perimetre of the thirteenth century apse was brought to light in the lowest levels, razed but perfectly identifiable to a certain height. Along with the pottery found in this and in other points of the building the excavation revealed a few blocks, including one with ribbing which formed part of the original structure, and inscription dating to 1621 and two panels decorated with crests, all used in the nineteenth century to create the platform for the heavy marble altar; the two crests appear from a preliminary analysis, to date from the earliest phase of the church, which dates from the late thirteenth through the fifteenth century. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 262 - Steven J.R. Ellis, Allison L.C. Emmerson, Amanda K. Pavlick, Kevin Dicus, Gina Tibbott. 2012. The 2011 Field Season at I.1.1-10, Pompeii: Preliminary report on the excavations. This article provides a preliminary report on the 2011 excavations undertaken by the University of Cincinnati’s ‘Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia’. This was the 7th season of excavations for the project at Pompeii, during which four trenches were excavated within four separate properties across insula I.1. The report focuses on the stratified sequences uncovered in each trench, and outlines the phases of activity and how some of these relate to the development of other parts of the buildings already excavated by the project throughout insula I.1, as well as to the results from our excavations on the other side of the via Stabiana at insula VIII.7. The earliest sequence of activities begins in the 4th century BCE, with major developments occurring in the second half of the 2nd century BCE (the establishment of the standing buildings), the Augustan period (the replacement of light-industrial spaces with retail), and the last decades of habitation (the recovery from the earthquake/s). PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 261 - Riccardo Villicich. 2012. Scavi nell’area della villa di Teoderico a Galeata (FC): i nuovi dati. In 2012 ended the fifteenth season of excavations at the site of the villa of Theodoric in Galeata. In all these years the investigations were concentrated in an area that was only partially explored in 1942. The site is multi-layered and characterised by seventeen centuries of occupation, from the 6th century B.C. to the 11th century A.D. Important new knowledge of the pre-Roman (a settlement of the late iron age) and Roman (a large villa) phases of the site have been acquired. The most important results, however, concern the late ancient phase. The excavations, in fact, have led to a new interpretation of the complex known as the “Palace” or villa of the Goth king Theodoric. The villa’s chronology and wealth make it likely that it belonged to Theodoric. It was laid out in several sectors or pavilions, connected by long corridors and ample open spaces. Of particular interest the discovery of the villa’s bath complex, completely excavated during the most recent campaigns, and of an octagonal room, belonging to the more prestigious pavilion of the villa. The complex is one of the latest examples, at least within the Italian peninsula, of the typology of great private residences of late antiquity. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 260 - Carlo De Mitri. 2012. Archeologia urbana a Lecce: lo scavo in via delle Giravolte. Rescue excavations carried out in the historic centre of Lecce have allowed us to record phases in the life of the city from the Hellenistic to the modern periods. Below the pavement of a bulding where maintenance work was being carried out were found Roman levels which obliterated a rectangular structure with foundations in squared blocks and elevations in small stones, probably open to the sky. The pottery found in the layers of abandoment on the floor of the building, interpreted as a sacred enclosure, allow us to date it to the late Hellenistic period. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 259 - Taco T. Terpstra. 2012. The 2011 Field Season at the Villa San Marco, Stabiae: Preliminary Report on the Excavations. In the summer of 2011, Columbia University, in collaboration with H2CU (Centro Interuniversitario per la Formazione Internazionale) started an archaeological project in ancient Stabiae: The “Advanced Program of Ancient History and Art” (APAHA), a program that is projected to run for five years. During this time, the project will perform stratigraphic excavations in one of the largest and most opulent villas in Campania, the Villa San Marco. This villa, along with Pompeii, Herculaneum, and the rest of Stabiae, was buried by Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. In the 18th century, when archaeological interest in the lost Campanian cities began, it was among the earliest structures to be uncovered. Excavated by the Bourbons to extract artefacts and wall paintings, it was then immediately reburied. A program to bring the villa back to light started in the 1950s and continues to the present day, but only with the aim to uncover what the Bourbons had already seen. APAHA is the first program ever to perform stratigraphic excavations in the Stabiae villas, investigating the pre-79 A.D. history of the site. The project’s goal is to understand the architectural history of the villa, as well as any existing older habitational layers, giving a full archaeological account of the stratigraphy from the eruption of Mt Vesuvius down to virgin soil. The project will also excavate in the street that delineates the northern section of the Villa San Marco with the aim of understanding the interaction between private and public space. Since the street is an extension of the Stabiae city-grid plan, part of the goal of these excavations is also to investigate the connection between the villa and the settlement of Stabiae. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 258 - Silvia Marini. 2012. Sigillata italica, sigillata africana e lucerne dal museo di Rosignano Marittimo. This contribution aims to present Terra Sigillata Italica, Terra Sigillata Africana and Lamps coming from the diggings of the Archaeological Group in the Roman site of San Gaetano di Vada, near to Rosignano (LI). The chronological range of these finds covers a period from the end of 1th century B.C. to 7th century AD. These wares are now out of their original context, and the standard, with which they have been held, is not known. Nevertheless they provide important data about types and productions kept in the site. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 257 - Marco Cavalieri, Antonia Fumo, Charles Bossu. 2012. Studio archeometrico delle ceramiche dalla villa romana di Aiano-Torraccia di Chiusi: risultati preliminari. The present paper presents some preliminary results of the archaeometric study of the pottery of Roman villa of Aiano-Torraccia di Chiusi, in the central Valdelsa (Siena). The analysis treats the coarsewares and red-slipped pottery, found during the first three excavation campaigns, in order to increase our knowledge of these ceramics, the site they come from and the surrounding area. The study began with a morphological study from which a typology was constructed, and then moved on to a statistical and distributional analysis. The archaeometric investigations addressed the issue of the manufacturing technique and their provenance; these were centered on minero-petrographic characterization of the fabrics and of the composition of the slip The data allows us to propose some preliminary considerations – and proposals for a new specific archaeometric study – and suggest relationships with different sides in the relations with manufacturing of different surrounding area. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 256 - Claudia Angelelli. 2012. Spoleto (PG). Indagini archeologiche nell\'area del Teatro Nuovo. Recent restorations carried out between 2003 and 2007 in the Teatro Nuovo at Spoleto (Umbria, Italy) gave the opportunity to explore the stalls area of the theatre. Archaeological excavations have brought to light remains of several buildings and stratigraphy dated from the pre-Roman period to 19th-century. The earliest evidence (a dry-stone wall and pottery) is very fragmentary and can be ascribed perhaps to the 5th-century BC or earlier; the second phase of settlement (about 241 B.C. or shortly after) consists, instead, of two large dry-stone structures, probably belonging to a public building and connected (?) with a Maenad-head antefix (late 3th - early 2th century BC). In the late Republican or early Imperial period (1th-century B.C. - early 1th-century A.C.) these structures were included in a large L-shaped substructure, built to retain the slope of the hill. During Late Antiquity (perhaps in the second half of 4th-century A.C.) the large retaining wall and other pre-existing structures were pulled down and buried by thick layers of rubble, resulting from demolition of a domus in the vicinity; above these layers was built a large drain, probably connected with a thermal complex situated more to the south-east (the so-called "Terme Torasiane"). Afterwards, Roman buildings were in part destroyed, in part reused for the construction of St. Andrew monastery, which in turn was pulled down in 1853 to make space for the modern building of Teatro Nuovo. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 255 - Lorena Trivigno. 2012. Indagini archeologiche di emergenza nel santuario di S. Antuono da Vienne (Grottole, MT) - dati preliminari. The site of S. Antuono Abate, along one of the most important arteries in the Bradano valley in Basilicata, lies a few kilometers from the fortification of Altojanni (mid- XII-XV/XVI d.C.) is already known in the historical and archaeological tradition of the area. The study of the monument took place in the conteext of the restoration, conservation and valorization supported by the comune of Grottole using regional funding. It has produced import information on the medieval church, which, on the basis of the previous excavation, structural characteristics and local historiographic tradition was probably active between the end of the eleventh or early twelfth century and the sixteenth century. Excavation of the church, together with the sources, has given greater definition to the stratigraphic succession, particularly to the post-medieval phases. To these we can now add two principal phases of reorganization of the pre-existing structures. Specifically, during the second half of the seventeenth century the first church went out of use, a series of rooms destined for comunal activity was created, and the second church, in use today, was built. The architectonical complex visible today was rebuilt in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The sanctuary has become one of the principal pilgrimage destination in Basilicata, and the sixteenth/seventeenth century church serves liturgical functions during the feast of of its thaumaturgical saint. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 254 - Tullio Aebischer, Caterina Rossetti, Giorgio Filippi, Enrico Iannuzzi. 2012. La base geodetica di Secchi sulla via Appia Antica (XIX sec.): il caposaldo B . The discovery of the manhole cover and a piece of the stone cornice built around the geodetic baseline’s mark near an ancient monument near the town of Frattocchie, allows us to precisely identify the geodetic baseline measured by Secchi in the middle of the XIX century. This is confirmed by documents and the comparison with another baseline’s mark discovered in 1999 in front of the tomb of Cecilia Metella. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 253 - Laura Simone Zopfi, Piera Terenzi. 2012. Area sepolcrale in uso dall’epoca celtica all’età tardoromana: cenni preliminari sui nuovi scavi presso Cascina Roma a Bernate Ticino (MI). At the archaeological site at Su Padrigheddu, which is adjacent to the large Nuragic tower complex of nuraghe S’Uraki, a large and richly varied collection of surface finds was made in the early 1980s, when the field concerned was deep-ploughed to create a eucalyptus plantation. As a result of the trees that have grown since, further fieldwork has been impossible. Although the site was initially interpreted as a cremation cemetery, more careful analysis of the pottery collected has shown that the ceramic assemblage is quite varied, which makes interpretation as a village more likely. The prevalence of Nuragic pottery leaves little doubt that it must be seen as an indigenous Nuragic settlement. It was probably first established in the Late Bronze Age and remained continuously inhabited until the early Roman Imperial period. Preliminary study of these finds in 2006 has allowed identification of Iron Age Phoenician and Nuragic pottery. More detailed research was carried out 2010-1 by macro analysis on fabrics and on manufacturing techniques through xeroradiography. The pottery appears to document a variety of interactions between local inhabitants and newcomers during the Iron Age. Analysis of the finds has documented early changes in Nuragic ceramic practices from the 8th c. BC, when new pottery types – such as so-called Sant’Imbenia-type amphorae and Phoenician-style bowls were produced with traditional – mainly hand-made – manufacturing techniques. Most of these new forms were made in the same fabric that characterises local Nuragic ceramic production since the Late Bronze Age. A different situation can be observed from the 7th c. BC, when new fabrics and more diversified and larger amounts of Phoenician-style pottery appeared. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 252 - Andrea Roppa. 2012. L’età del Ferro nella Sardegna centro-occidentale. Il villaggio di Su Padrigheddu, San Vero Milis . At the archaeological site at Su Padrigheddu, which is adjacent to the large Nuragic tower complex of nuraghe S’Uraki, a large and richly varied collection of surface finds was made in the early 1980s, when the field concerned was deep-ploughed to create a eucalyptus plantation. As a result of the trees that have grown since, further fieldwork has been impossible. Although the site was initially interpreted as a cremation cemetery, more careful analysis of the pottery collected has shown that the ceramic assemblage is quite varied, which makes interpretation as a village more likely. The prevalence of Nuragic pottery leaves little doubt that it must be seen as an indigenous Nuragic settlement. It was probably first established in the Late Bronze Age and remained continuously inhabited until the early Roman Imperial period. Preliminary study of these finds in 2006 has allowed identification of Iron Age Phoenician and Nuragic pottery. More detailed research was carried out 2010-1 by macro analysis on fabrics and on manufacturing techniques through xeroradiography. The pottery appears to document a variety of interactions between local inhabitants and newcomers during the Iron Age. Analysis of the finds has documented early changes in Nuragic ceramic practices from the 8th c. BC, when new pottery types – such as so-called Sant’Imbenia-type amphorae and Phoenician-style bowls were produced with traditional – mainly hand-made – manufacturing techniques. Most of these new forms were made in the same fabric that characterises local Nuragic ceramic production since the Late Bronze Age. A different situation can be observed from the 7th c. BC, when new fabrics and more diversified and larger amounts of Phoenician-style pottery appeared. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 251 - Elisa Bonacini, Maria Turco, Lucia Arcifa. 2012. L’insediamento di contrada Grammena a Valcorrente tra tardoantico e alto medioevo. La longue durée di un sito rurale in provincia di Catania . The archaeological excavation conducted by the Soprintendenza di Catania in 2007 brought to light a Roman farm, characterized by multiple phases (from the third to the seventh century A.D. ) in the area of a previous Hellenistic settlement (fourth - third centuries b.C.). In the late Byzantine period (between the eighth and the first half of the ninth century) a three-naved basilica, with a narthex, was built, destroying in part the remains of the farm, as well as those of the late antique settlement. The basilica underwent various modifications before being transformed into a stone dump. The plan is similar to thoe of other Sicilian religious buildings traditionally dated between the fifth and the sixth century A.D. and shows that it was well-rooted in the Late Antique tradition. The centrality of the settlement (not far from the Roman aqueduct that crossed the area, and next to a road in use betwen the Roman and the Late-medieval periods) explains the continuity of the settlement at a junction that was clearly important in this area. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 250 - Laura Simone Zopfi, Carlo Liborio. 2012. Fornaci d’età romana per la produzione di laterizi a Cassano d’Adda (MI). Archaeological excavations have brought to light a major workshop of the production of bricks and tiles and characterized by three kilns and various other structures, less well preserved, that can be attributed to the same complex. The best-preserved kiln has a rectangular chamber supported on arches with a single central corridor. The third chamber was built on the remains of the second, and had a double corridor. At least one period of use of the workshop can be dated to the first century A.D. by a sherd of thin-walled pottery. The choice of the site is more obscure, as there are no substantial deposits of suitable brick clay in the area. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 249 - Eric E. Poehler, Steven J.R. Ellis. 2012. The 2011 Season of the Pompeii Quadriporticus Project: The Southern and Northern Sides . The Pompeii Quadriporticus Project (PQP) is an archaeological and architectural research project that is designed to conduct the definitive study of one of the largest and most important monumental buildings in the World Heritage site of Pompeii, Italy. Combining cutting edge technologies with an exhaustive examination of the physical fabric of the poorly-understood Quadriporticus, and incorporating the results from the excavated remains of its easternmost borders (Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia), the PQP is putting this long ignored monument back into its archictural and urban contexts. The PQP is co-directed by Dr. Eric Poehler (University of Massachusetts-Amherst) and Dr. Steven Ellis (University of Cincinnati), who is also the director of PQP's sister project, the Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia. Our work is generously funded by a University of Massachusetts-Amherst Faculty Reseach Grant / Healey Endowment Grant, the UMass Department of Classics, the Five Colleges, Inc., by the Louise Taft Semple Fund of the Department of Classics at the University of Cincinnati and by a gift from Cardinal Intellectual Property. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 248 - Giuseppe Lepore, Maria Raffaella Ciuccarelli, Francesco Belfiori , Gilda Assenti , Federica Boschi , Maria Letizia Carra , Tommaso Casci Ceccacci, Mauro De Donatis, Elena Maini, Enrico Ravaioli, Michele Silani, Fabio Visani, D. Savelli. 2012. Progetto “archeologia urbana a Senigallia” I: le ricerche di via Cavallotti . The first rescue excavations in the historic center of Senigallia began in October 2010, in connection with the project ‘Urban Archaeology at Senigallia’. During the work of reconstruction of an eighteenth century building geophysical investigation was undertaken of its ground levels, followed by an excavation in which numerous structure attributable to the Roman colony of Sena Gallica (284-3 B.C.) came to light. A complex orthogonal network of walls, emerged, defining at least four rooms, within which were created at different times at least two wells and some functional structures, including the preparation for a torcular in brick and clay. These structures all appear to date from the III century B.C. The cardinal orientation of the walls allows some interesting hypotheses about the urban topography, which, in the later Roman phase, was oriented northeast-southwest. But the most surprising discovery was that of an earlier settlement, below the Roman structures. Almost obliterated by the later buildings, it had the same orientation, and is dated by the material found to the Vth—IVth century B.C. The settlement is probably to be attributed to the Picene culture. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 247 - Michael A. Anderson, Claire J. Weiss , Briece R. Edwards, Megan Gorman, Daniel Jackson, Richard Hobbs, Victoria Keitel, Clare O’Bryen, Stephanie Pearson, Erin Pitt, Aurora Tucker. 2012. Via Consolare Project – 2007-2011 Field Seasons in Insula VII 6. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 246 - Francesca Boldrighini. 2012. Saggio di scavo nell’area settentrionale delle Terme di Diocleziano a Roma. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 245 - Attilio Mastrocinque, Fabio Saggioro. 2012. Magnetometry at Grumentum in Ancient Lucania . PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet